Friday, September 30, 2005

English Captain: Thomas Harman

Thomas Harman served in the Restoration navy. In 1671, Thomas Harman served as Lieutenant on the Adventure. In 1672, he was appointed as captain of the Tiger. In August, he was with the fleet, where he was assigned to Richard Beach's division in the Blue Squadron. On 22 February 1674, he fought an action with the Dutch frigate Schakerloo, commanded by Passchier de Witte. Thomas Harman took the Schakerloo (28 guns), and was wounded in the fight. On 12 June 1675, the King appointed him as captain of the Sapphire. In August 1677, he had taken an Algerian warship, the Date Tree. He attacked another, the Golden Horse (46 guns), but the Sapphire lost its mainmast and he was killed on 10 September 1677. Sources:
  1. William Laird Clowes, The Royal Navy: A History from the Earliest Times to the Present, Vol.II, 1898.
  2. David Syrett, R. L. DiNardo, The Commissioned Sea Officers of the Royal Navy 1660-1815, 1994.
  3. J.R. Tanner, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Naval Manuscripts in the Pepysian Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge, Vol.I, 1903.

Thursday, September 29, 2005

A document from circa May or June 1653

I have a list of ships and some of the captains for ships from about May or June 1653. There is a very similar list in The First Dutch War, Vol.V, that is from Thurloe's state papers, Vol.I, page 287. This list is divided by Admiralty/Directors:
Admiralty of Amsterdam

Capt. Jan van Campen         the ship Overissel
Capt. Overcamp               the ship Pelicaen
Capt. van den Bos            the ship Engel Gabriel
Capt. Ary van Loenen         the ship Goude Reael             73 men
Capt. Evert Anthonissen      the ship ...
Capt. Gillis Thyssen Campen  the ship ...

Noorderkwartier

Capt. Jan Heck               the ship Eenhoorn                80 men
Capt. Gerrit Munt            the ship Lastdrager              60 men
Capt. de Harder              the ship ...                     80 men
Capt. Boetius                the ship Fazant van Medemblik    90 men

Directors of Amsterdam

Capt. ?                      the ship the Keurvorst van Keulen 

Friesland

Commandeur Stellingwerff     the ship Zevenwolden
Capt. Bruijnsvelt            the ship Breda
Capt. Wagenaar               the ship Graaf Hendrik

Fireships

Commandeur Claeszoon         the ship Cleyn Hoop
Commandeur Cornelis de Joris the ship Groot Hoop
Commandeur Schoonevelt       the ship Fortuijn
Commandeur Wearnar Crimp     the ship Son

Galliots

Skipper Trommel
Reynst Corneliszoon         

Dutch Captain: Jacob Oudart

Jacob Oudart served the Admiralty of the Maze. He commanded the ship Stad Utrecht (48 guns and a crew of 200 men) at the Battle of Lowestoft in June 1665. He was assigned to Cornelis Evertsen de Oude's Sixth Squadron. At the end of the battle, the Stad Utrecht was one of four ships that had collided and become tangled. These were the Koevorden (56 guns), the Prins Maurits (53 guns), the Elf Steden (54 guns), and the Stad Utrecht (48 guns). The Duke of York, in the Royal Charles, came upon the tangled ships, and ordered a fireship to attack if they would not surrender. They would not, so John Gething's fireship Fame was sent in to burn them. One of the ships exploded, and that freed the Elf Steden, which escaped. The rest of the ships were destroyed, and no more than 100 men were rescued. Sources:
  1. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.

Wednesday, September 28, 2005

Missing Dutch ship names for the First Anglo-Dutch War

While we have learned a great deal in the last year, there still remains more that we need to find. One of the things that we need is to fill the rest of the missing ship names for Dutch captains in the First Anglo-Dutch War. There are also ships for which we don't know captains. This is the missing ship name list:
  1. 1652 Lambert Bartelszoon crew 100 men Admiralty of Zeeland
  2. 1652 Pieter Adriaanszoon van Blocker 28 guns crew 105 men Hoorn Directors
  3. 1652 Ruth Jacobszoon Buys 26 guns crew 105 men Rotterdam Directors
  4. Dordrecht jacht (an estimate) 1652 Pieter Gorcum 17 guns crew 50 men Admiralty of Zeeland
  5. 1652 Abraham van der Hulst 26 guns crew 100 men Admiralty of Amsterdam
  6. 1652 Gijsbert Malcontent 28 guns crew 110 men Enkhuizen Directors
  7. 1652 Cornelis Rocuszoon Teincen 34 guns crew 110 men Zierikzee Directors
  8. 1652 Teunis Vechterszoon crew 70 men Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier
  9. 8/1652 Jacob Wolfertszoon Admiralty of Zeeland
There must be more, but this is the most obvious list of missing ship names.

Dutch Captain: Cornelis Joosten Smient (or Joosten Smient)

Cornelis Joosten Smient probably is the same man just called Joosten Smient by Frank Fox. He fought in the Battle of Lowestoft, where he was assigned to Cornelis Tromp's 5th Squadron. He commanded the Swedish prize Shager Roos (38 guns and a crew of 140 men). In 1667, he commanded the Star (32 guns) in the Raid on Chatham. He was assigned to Van Ghent's squadron. Sources:
  1. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.
  2. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.

Tuesday, September 27, 2005

New information about First Anglo-Dutch War ships and captains

I have a document from September 1652 that has the following Directors' ships and captains listed:
  • Blauwe Arent Capt. Dirck Pater of Amsterdam
  • Fortuijn Capt. Frederick de Coninck of Amsterdam
  • Vergulde Sonn Capt. Jacob Claesz. Duijm of Enkhuizen
  • Sampson Capt. Jacob Pietersz. Houck of Hoorn
  • Vergulde Merman Capt. Jan Fredericksz. Houcboot of Edam
  • St. Vincent Capt. Andries Douwesz. (Pascaert) of Harlingen
  • Vergulde Pelicaen Capt. Arien (Adriaan) Heeres Cleijntien of Harlingen
These are listed in the list from The First Dutch War, Vol.I, which is copied from the 1652 edition of the Hollandsche Mercurius. Captain Houcboot's ship name is hard to read, but this seems plausible. Usually, the ship name would be written as Meerman. Also, we had thought that Andries Douweszoon Pascaert's ship in the summer of 1652 was the Prins Willem. This document indicates that at least by September, he commanded the Sint Vincent. If that is correct, perhaps we know the armament for the Sint Vincent (30 guns). Later in 1653, we know that the Sint Vincent had been commanded by Adriaan Heeres Cleijntien.

Dutch Captain: Huybert Geel

Huybert Geel served the Admiralty of Amsterdam. His first name is variously spelled Huybert, Huibert, or Huibrecht. He commanded the advijsjacht Triton (12 guns) in 1672 and 1673. He fought in the Battle of Solebay in 1672, where he was assigned to De Ruyter's squadron. In June 1673, he commanded the advijsjacht Mercurius (12 guns). He apparently was only at the First Schooneveld Battle. Sources:
  1. James C. Bender, unpublished manuscript "Dutch Ships 1600-1700", 2005.
  2. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.

Monday, September 26, 2005

Update on Dutch Captain: Pieter Bakker

This is based on my translation of piece by Mr. Carl Stapel:
Pieter Bakker

Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier

1672  Captain

Date               Note
1672  9 August     With the fleet as captain of the frigate Mercurius (built in 1669,
                     and carrying 24 guns and with a crew of 100 men).
     20 September  He sails to the Texel with the ship.

1673  7 June       In the first Schooneveld Battle, he was captain of the 
                    ship of the line Jupiter (built in 1653, carrying 42 guns
                     and with a crew of 137 sailors and 63 soldiers) in the 
                      squadron and division of Lt-Admiral Cornelis Tromp.
                       The Jupiter was almost taken, but he was able to 
                        recover the ship on 14 June.
     21 June       In the second Schooneveld Battle, he was still captain of
                     the Jupiter, but now in Isaac Sweers' squadron. He was
                      accused of not doing his duty, but was cleared.
     21 August     In the Battle of the Texel (Kijkduin), he again commanded
                     the Jupiter (built in 1653 with 42 guns).
1674    April      In De Ruyter's fleet sent to Martinique. He was captain
                     of the Jupiter (built in 1653, with 40 guns, and a crew
                      of 166 sailors and 31 soldiers).
1676               In the Sound with the fleet of Cornelis Eversten de Jonge,
                     again as captain of the Jupiter (built in 1653,
                      carrying 44 guns and with a crew of 180 men). 

Sunday, September 25, 2005

Dutch Captain: Hendrick Schrevels

I noticed that Hendrick Schrevels was listed in my document prior to 1645. In March 1628, he commanded the Zeehaan frigate (6 guns and a crew of 50 men). The Zeehaan was a vessel of 50 lasts. In 1635, he commanded the Harderwijk, as he did in 1639. He arrived late to the fleet and was assigned to the squadron of Denijs. In 1641, he commanded the Gouda. In 1643, he commanded the Frederik Hendrick, a flagship. With Witte de With's fleet in May-June 1645, he is listed as commanding the Prins Hendrick (30 guns and a crew of 100 men). Almost certainly, the Prins Hendrick is actually the Frederik Hendrick. Sources:
  1. James C. Bender, unpublished manuscript "Dutch Ships 1600-1700", 2005.
  2. Dr. M.G. De Boer, Tromp en de Armada van 1639, 1941.
  3. Dr. F. Graefe, De Kapiteinsjaren van Maerten Harpertszoon Tromp, 1938.
  4. G. W. Kernkamp, De Sleutels van de Sont, 1890.

Three men named John Brooks in the Restoration navy

Three men named John Brooks served in the Restoration navy. One John Brooks was appointed captain of the Little Mary by Prince Rupert and the Duke of Albemarle in 1666. He died prior to 1689. Another John Brooks was appointed lieutenant of the Yarmouth in 1664. He also died prior to 1689. The other John Brooks was appointed captain of the Greenwich in 1666. In June, the Greenwich was still under construction and had not been launched. He did fight in the St. James's Day Battle, where the Greenwich was assigned to Sir Joseph Jordan's division in the Red Squadron. In 1672, he commanded the 3rd Rate Mary. He fought in the Battle of Solebay, where he was assigned to Sir Joseph Jordan's division in the Blue Squadron. In August 1672, he was in Sir John Harman's division in the Blue Squadron. By June 1673, Sir Roger Strickland commanded the Mary. This John Brooks died in 1678. Sources:
  1. R. C. Anderson, Journals and Narratives of the Third Dutch War, 1946.
  2. Julian S. Corbett, “A Note on the Drawings in the Possession of The Earl of Dartmouth Illustrating The Battle of Solebay May 28, 1672 and The Battle of the Texel August 11, 1673”, 1908.
  3. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.
  4. J.R. Tanner, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Naval Manuscripts in the Pepysian Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge, Vol.I, 1903.

Saturday, September 24, 2005

The Lineone.net website

There is a website, lineone.net, titled Seapower: 1652-1860, that I first noticed, this evening. This site has some pictures posted that I did not want to post, due to concerns about copyright issues. For example, there is the van de Velde drawing of the Brederode, drawn while the Brederode was enroute to the Battle of the Sound.

English Captain: Packington Brooks

Packington Brooks served in the Restoration navy. In 1661, he held two appointments as lieutenant, first on the Royal James and then on the Royal Charles. In 1662, he was appointed captain of the Foresight. In 1664, he was appointed captain of the Eagle. Later in 1664, he was captain of the Foresight again. In June 1665 he was in the Channel and did not take part in the Battle of Lowestoft. In August 1665, he fought at Bergen, in the attack on the Dutch East Indiamen. Sources:
  1. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.
  2. J.R. Tanner, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Naval Manuscripts in the Pepysian Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge, Vol.I, 1903.

Friday, September 23, 2005

English Captain: Robert Stout

Robert Stout served in the Restoration navy. He was lieutenant on the Resolution in 1665. Later in 1665, he was lieutenant of the Revenge. In 1666, he was appointed as lieutenant of the Henry. Later in 1666, he was lieutenant of the Lion. In 1668, he was appointed as captain of the Roe ketch. In 1669, he was appointed as second lieutenant of the St. David. He served under the command of Sir Thomas Allin. In early October, he commanded four boats in an operation against North African pirates. By 1671, he was appointed as captain of the Fountain fireship. He fought in the Battle of Solebay as commander of the Fountain. A shot from a Dutch ship burnt the Fountain. Later in 1672, he was captain of the Forester. He held a series of appointments in 1673. Early in 1673, he commanded the Princess. By 21 January 1673, the King appointed him to command the Warspite. Later in 1673, Prince Rupert reappointed him to command the Warspite. In the Warspite, he fought in the Battle of the Texel in August. Finally, on 15 June 1674, the King appointed him to command the Success. He died some time before 1689. Sources:
  1. R. C. Anderson, The Journals of Sir Thomas Allin, Vol.II 1667-1678, 1940.
  2. R. C. Anderson, Journals and Narratives of the Third Dutch War, 1946.
  3. David Syrett, R. L. DiNardo, The Commissioned Sea Officers of the Royal Navy 1660-1815, 1994.
  4. J.R. Tanner, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Naval Manuscripts in the Pepysian Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge, Vol.I, 1903.

Dutch Captain: Jacob Sijvertszoon Spanheijm

De Sleutels van de Sont lists a Jacob Syvertsz. as serving the New Directors of Amsterdam in 1645. He commanded the ship Venetia (32 guns and a crew of 78 men). I wondered if this was the same man as Jacob Sijvertszoon Spanheijm, who served the Amsterdam Directors in 1652 and 1653. Up until the Battle of Portland (the Three Days Battle), he commanded the ship Elias (34 guns). The Elias was eventually captured by the English at the Battle of the Gabbard in 1653, and taken into their service. Jacob Sijvertszoon Spanheijm was killed in the Battle of Portland. I also wondered if the Venetia might have also served in the First Anglo-Dutch War. One of the two Venetias listed in The First Dutch War, Vol.IV, was actually named the Julius Caesar. Sources:
  1. C. T. Atkinson, Ed., The First Dutch War, Vol.IV, 1910.
  2. James C. Bender, unpublished manuscript "Dutch Ships 1600-1700", 2005.
  3. Gerhard Wilhelm Kernkamp, De Sleutels van de Sont, 1890.

Thursday, September 22, 2005

Dutch Captain: Evert de Liefde

Evert de Liefde served the Admiralty of the Maze. In June 1674, he commanded the Griffoen, snauw, in De Ruyter's expedition to Martinique. In 1688, he was with the fleet that carried Prins Willem III to England. He commanded the Zeelandia (48 guns). He fought at the Battle of La Hougue in 1692, where the commanded the Zeven Provinciƫn, De Ruyter's old flagship. In 1696, he commanded the Dordrecht (72 guns). Sources:
  1. James C. Bender, unpublished manuscript "Dutch Ships 1600-1700", 2005.
  2. Carl Stapel, unpublished manuscript "Vlootlijst La Hogue 2 juni 1692", 2005.

Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier ships with Witte de With in 1645

There were six ships belonging to the Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier with Witte de With's fleet in 1645, on the operation to convoy 300 merchant ships into the Sound without paying the toll to the Danes. These ships were the following:
  1. Hoop, 26 guns crew 96 Schout-bij-Nacht Halffhoorn
  2. Wapen van Alkmaar, 24 guns crew 80 Captain Jan Warnaertszoon Capelman
  3. Wapen van Hoorn, 24 guns crew 87 Captain Claes Tesselaar
  4. Medemblik (Kasteel van Medemblik?), 26 guns Crew 80 Captain Gabriel Antheunissen
  5. Sampson, 28 guns crew 92 Captain Schellinghout
  6. (not listed, but perhaps the Monnik), 26 guns crew 80 Arent Dirckszoon
Source:
  1. G.W. Kernkamp, De Sleutels van de Sont, 1890.

Wednesday, September 21, 2005

Today, I received my copy of De Sleutels van de Sont (UPDATED)

I received a book today that I had purchased from Charbo's Antiquariaat. The name is De Sleutels van de Sont, by G.W. Kernkamp. Mr. Carl Stapel had recommended the book to me. The book has some good material, such as the list of ships, guns, crew, and captains for Witte de With's fleet that convoyed 300 merchant ships into the Sound without paying the toll in 1645. I immediately noticed that several of the captains commanded the same ships during the First Anglo-Dutch War. That led me to wonder if the ship commanded by Gijsbert Malcontent was the same as what he commanded in 1652. In 1645, he commanded the Getrouwen Harder (34 guns and a crew of 100 men). The Getrouwen Harder was a ship of the Enkhuizen Directors. In 1652, he still commanded a ship of the Enkhuizen Directors, although the armament was given as 28 guns and a crew of 110 men. Another captain was Jan Pieterszoon Houck, who commanded a Directors ship of Hoorn, the Swarten Beer (24 guns and a crew of 81 men). In 1652, he also commanded a Hoorn Director's ship, this listed as having 30 guns and a crew of 110 men. In both 1645 and 1652, Gabriel Antheunissen commanded the Medemblik (or Kasteel van Medemblik) (26 guns and a crew of 80 men). Another was Jan Warnaertszoon Capelman, who commanded the Wapen van Alkmaar (or Alkmaar) in both 1645 and 1652. Given that, we might ask if Arent Dirckszoon commanded the Monnick in 1645, as he did in 1652? We also know that Adries Douweszoon Pascaert commanded the Harlingen Director's ship Prins Willem (28 gunsand a crew of 90 men) in both 1645 and 1652. This is really interesting material, if you are into this sort of thing.

The fleet that took Willem III to England in 1688

This is based on the list in Vol.3 of Geschiedenis van het Nederlandsche Zeewezen, by J. C. de Jonge, from 1869. This is the list of ships and captains in the fleet that took Prins Willem III to England in 1688:
The Fleet that took Prins Willem III to England in 1688

Admiralty of the Maze

Maze, 68 guns  Schout-bij-Nacht J. van Braken
Maagd van Dordrecht, 68 guns  G. Callenburgh
Delft, 56 guns  J. Snellen
Schieland, 50 guns  W. van Eeden
Honsholaardijk, 48 guns  B. Rees
Zeelandia, 46 guns  46 guns  E. de Liefde
Rotterdam, 44 guns  Convent
Gorcum, 42 guns  C. van Brakel
frigate Briel, 30 guns  J. van der Esch


Admiralty of Amsterdam

Leiden, 62 guns  Lt-admiral W. Bastiaensz Schepers
Provincie van Utrecht, 62 guns  62 guns Vice-Admiral P. van Almonde
Wapen van Utrecht, 66 guns  Schout-bij-Nacht Schey
Zeelandia, 62 guns  Commandeur G. v.d. Dussen
Friesland, 62 guns  Louis, Graaf van Nassau
Gideon, 60 guns  J. van Hardenbroeck
Akerboom, 60 guns  J. Bouwens
Elswout, 60 guns  A. F. van Zyll
Agatha, 50 guns  J. Kuiper
Castricum, 50 guns  van Bassen
Beemster, 50 guns  H. van Tol
Stad en Lande, P. van Laeren
Vrede, 46 guns  P. C. Decker
Noordholland, 46 guns  P. van der Gysen
Nijmegen, 46 guns  G. Hooft
Harderwijk, 46 guns  C. van der Zaan
Maria Elisabeth, 46 guns  W. van der Zaan
Schattershof, 46 guns  A. Manard
Sneek, 36 guns  Ph. van der Goes
Edam, 36 guns  A. Taalman
Oud-Carspel, 36 guns  A. Stilte
Asperen, 36 guns  D. Egmont van Neyenburgh
Anna, 34 guns  D. Schey
Hazewind, 32 guns  P. v. d. Dussen
Wulpenburg, 32 guns  A. Noordhey
Damiaten, 30 guns  J. Hoogenhoeck
light frigate Brak, 24 guns  commandeur W. Cats
light frigate Bommel, 24 guns  commandeur J. Jansse Bout
light frigate Postiljon, 24 guns  commandeur Claes Jansse Boeck
advijsjacht Bruijnvisch, 20 guns  commandeur H. Veer
fireship Kraanvogel  Wybrand Barentse
fireship Paauw  Gillis Jansse Du Pon
fireship Strombolus  Daniel Rouckeze
fireship Zes Gebroeders  Simon Louwrens Seelt
fireship Monte Vesuvius  Fred. Dirckse Varckevisser
plus 2 galliots

Admiralty of Zeeland

Cortgene, 50 guns  Lt-Admiral Cornelis Evertsen, commander in chief
Gekroonde Burg, 60 guns  Vice-Admiral C. van de Putte
Veere, 60 guns  Schout-bij-Nacht Geleyn Evertsen
Goes, 30 guns  C. J. Mosselman
Somer, 26 or 28 guns  A. den Boer
plus 2 hoekers as advijsjachts

Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier

Noorderkwartier, 64 guns  Schout-bij-Nacht Jan Dick
Wapen van Hoorn, 44 guns  Captain Muys
frigate Mercurius, 30 guns  Leendert Cuypers
fireship Keurvorst van Brandenburg  commandeur M. Jansz Dick
fireship Maagd van Enkhuizen

Tuesday, September 20, 2005

English Captain: John Dawson

John Dawson served in the Reformation navy. In 1666, he was a lieutenant on the Defiance. In 1670, he was appointed captain of the fireship True Love. In 1672, he was appointed first lieutenant of the St. Michael. In 1673, he was second lieutenant of the St. Michael. Later in 1673, Prince Rupert appointed him captain of the Advice. This happened on July 1st, 1673, after captains had been courtmartialed. He died about 1675. Sources:
  1. R. C. Anderson, Journals and Narratives of the Third Dutch War, 1946.
  2. David Syrett, R. L. DiNardo, The Commissioned Sea Officers of the Royal Navy 1660-1815, 1994.
  3. J.R. Tanner, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Naval Manuscripts in the Pepysian Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge, Vol.I, 1903.

Monday, September 19, 2005

Dutch Captain: Herman Egbertszoon Wolff

Herman Egbertszoon Wolff served the Admiralty of Amsterdam. He fought in the Battle of Lowestoft in June 1665, where he commanded the old Star (36 guns and a crew of 144 men). The Star had been built in 1644 and had dimensions 120ft x 28ft x 12ft. The Star was assigned to Lt-Admiral van Wassenaer's squadron. Sadly, there is no other information available in published sources that are available to use. Sources:
  1. James C. Bender, unpublished manuscript "Dutch Ships 1600-1700", 2005.
  2. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.

Sunday, September 18, 2005

Dutch Captain: Christiaan Eldertszoon

Christiaan Eldertszoon served the Admiralty of the Maze (Rotterdam). He commanded the Wapen van Utrecht in the Battle of Lowestoft in June 1665. He was assigned to Jan Evertsen's Second Squadron. In this battle, the Wapen van Utrecht carried 36 guns and had a crew of 163 men. About 18 August, he was with De Ruyter's fleet and in De Rutyer's squadron. That list gives the name of his ship as the Utrecht (36 guns, a crew of 110 sailors, 10 marines, and 20 soldiers). On about 21 August, he was operating under the command of Vice-Admiral van Nes, which is plausible, as he may have been in van Nes's division in De Ruyter's squadron. The 18 August list includes van Nes in De Ruyter's squadron. Vice-Admiral van Nes flew his flag on the Rotterdam (built in 1658, with 46 guns, a crew of 189 sailors, 9 marines, and 30 soldiers). On 13 September 1665, he was assigned to De Ruyter's First Squadron. Sources:
  1. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.
  2. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.

Saturday, September 17, 2005

Dutch Captain: Gerbrant Boes

Gerbrant Boes served the Admiralty of Amsterdam. All we know of him is that he commanded the Ter Goes in 1665, and fought in the Battle of Lowestoft. The Ter Goes carried 46 guns and had a crew of 185 men. The Ter Goes was a small ship of her rate, as her dimensions were only 125ft x 29ft x 11.5ft. She had been built in 1641. Most other ships built at the time which carried 40 guns were 128ft x 31.5ft x 12ft. The Zon, built in 1640, is an example of that charter. Sources:
  1. James C. Bender, unpublished manuscript "Dutch Ships 1600-1700", 2005.
  2. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.

Friday, September 16, 2005

Update on Daniel Elsevier

This is based on my translation of an update on Daniel Elsevier by Mr. Carl Stapel:
Daniel Elsevier

Born circa 1630
Died 26 February 1688

1686 Vice-Admiral
1683 Schout-bij-Nacht
1672 Captain
1665 Lieutenant

1666  June  He fought in the Four Day’s Battle and took Admiral 
            Ayscue to the Netherlands.

1672     He was appointed to captain.

1672 7 June He was captain of the Stavoren in the Battle of Solebay on 7 June 1672. 
            His ship was taken and he was captured but later exchanged. 

1673 7 June He commanded the Zeelandia (built in 1643, with 44 guns 
            and a crew of 200 men) in the First Schooneveld Battle.

    14 June He fought in the Second Schooneveld Battle, again in the Zeelandia. 

  21 August In the Battle of Kijkduin (the Texel) he commanded the Zeelandia. 

1674        In the expedition under Cornelis Tromp near the French coast 
            and the Mediterranean Sea. He commanded the Schattershof 
            (built in 1672 with 44 guns).

1675  May   On board the Ackerboom (built in 1664 with 60 guns) under 
            Philips van Almonde in the Sound.

1676        He fought at Bornholm and Oland against Sweden.

1677 18 March  He was a pall bearer at the burial of Michiel De Ruyter.

1678       He served under Vice-Admiral Cornelis Evertsen de Jonge 
           in the relief expedition sent to Spain.

1681       Sometime in 1681 he and Captain Cornelis Tijloos had 
            picked up four Moors at sea and sold them as slaves at Livorno.

1683      He commanded the Moriaanshoofd in Schepers expedition to 
          Gothenburg and saved the crew of the Hollandia on 15 November, 
          on the homeward voyage. 

1688      He died on 26 February.

Sources:

Honor Roll of J. C. Mollema

Notes of A. Vreugdenhil in the Scheepvaart Museum in Amsterdam

Thursday, September 15, 2005

Dutch Captain: Jacob Wiltschut (UPDATED)

Jacob Wiltschut served the Admiralty of Amsterdam. He was born in 1620. Up until 1658, he had served in the West Indian Company. In 1665, he commanded the Harderwijk (46 guns). He fought in the Battle of Lowestoft, where the Harderwijk was assigned to Lt-Admiral van Wassenaer's squadron. At Lowestoft, the Harderwijk had a crew of 200 men. In August 1665, he was with De Ruyter's fleet, where he still commanded the Harderwijk. In August, the Harderwijk's crew consisted of 170 sailors, 10 marines, and 29 soldiers. The Harderwijk had been built in 1662, and her dimensions were 133ft x 34.5ft x 14ft. There was an Amsterdam ship in 1665 with 46 guns that is listed by De Jonge: 4-18pdr, 18-12pdr, 20-8pdr, and 6-3pdr. The 18pdr and the 12pdr were probably on the lower tier with the 8pdr on the upper tier. The 3pdr were probably on the quarterdeck. Jacob Wiltschut fled the fleet in September 1665. On 9 September, in a heavy storm on the way back from Bergen to the Netherlands, the fleet became scattered. He joined Lt-Admiral Aert van Nes's squadron of 19 ships. They ran into the entire English fleet. Jacob Wiltschut put on extra sail and escaped aboard the Harderwijk. He said: "I will fight only if they catch up with me, because 19 ships can do little against 90 warships." He was courtmartialed on September 29th, 1665 and declared honorless and his sword was broken before his eyes and he was cashiered from service (my paraphrase of Carl Stapel's words). Sources:
  1. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.
  2. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.
  3. J. C. De Jonge, Geschiedenis van het Nederlandsche Zeewezen, Vol.I, 1858.
  4. Communication from Mr. Carl Stapel.

Wednesday, September 14, 2005

Dutch Captain: Arnout de Holk

We know very little about Arnout de Holk, who served the Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier. He only appears in sources available to me in the list of ships and captains sent to relieve Danzig in 1656, under the command of Lt-Admiral van Wassenaer. After Charles X, king of Sweden, conquered Poland in 1655, rebels took over Danzig. The Dutch opposed the domination of the Baltic by Sweden, as the Dutch depended on trade for their existence. The Wikipedia says that the Dutch imported grain from Poland, as well as lumber and other naval supplies, which we know included iron guns from Sweden. The list of Lt-Admiral van Wassenaer's fleet has been published in multiple places. It may have originated in the Hollandsche Mercurius for 1656, and Brandt and others seem to have simply copied that article. The list is somewhat suspect due to instances of many captains listed as commanding different ships than they commanded before and after the operation. Arnout de Holk is said to be captain of the Burg van Alkmaar (36 guns and a crew of 155 men) built in 1654. Her dimensions were 130ft x 32ft x 12ft, similar to the Jupiter.

Tuesday, September 13, 2005

Dutch Captain: Jan Halfhoorn

In the sources available to me, I cannot even find Captain Halfhoorn's first name, but Andrew says that it is Jan. Captain Halfhoorn served the Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier. He commanded the old Jonge Prins (36 guns) in the Battle of Lowestoft, where the Jonge Prins was assigned to Volckert Schram's squadron. In the aftermath of the battle, the Jonge Prins was taken by the small Martin galley (14 guns). Sources:
  1. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.

Sunday, September 11, 2005

Dutch Captain: Adriaan Solderwagen

Adriaan Solderwagen served the Admiralty of the Maze. He fought in the Battle of Lowestoft, where he commanded the small frigate Schiedam (25 guns). He was assigned to Jan Evertsen's squadron. By August, he was no longer in command of the Schiedam. He does not appear in my references after that. Sources:
  1. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.
  2. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.

Saturday, September 10, 2005

I am reformatting my "Dutch Ships 1600-1700" manuscript

I have wanted more room on each line of my "Dutch Ships 1600-1700" manuscript. It is also called "Dutch Ships Ordered By Captain", as that is what it is. I switched the page size to 8-1/2in x 14in. Now, I can spread the ship name and captain name fields, so that there is adequate room for the largest names. I also spread the right side wider so that "lasts" is its own field, rather than dual use with the dimensions. Aside from that, I am determined to add the smaller vessels and fireships to the list. I am primarily relying on Brandt's biography, as well as Frank Fox's book A Distant Storm, and Prof. Bruijn's old book about 1673.

The row-jacht Rotterdam in 1639

These are more notes from Mr. Carl Stapel. It is particularly significant in that we have dimensions for a ship, prior to 1648:
Rotterdam 1639               

Admiralty  Ship         Type         Dimensions          Armament  In Service
Friesland  Rotterdam    row-jacht    100ft x 20ft x 8ft  10 guns   1639-1642

Date    Captain                        Guns Crew Notes
5/1639 Joris Pietersz van den Broeck  10        from the Goeree Gat
8/1639 Joris Pietersz van den Broeck  10   70   Reconnoitered the Spanish Armada
10/1639 Joris Pietersz van den Broeck  10   70   Battle of the Downs.
                                                 Captured a galleon.
  1640 Joris Pietersz van den Broeck  10        captured a Duinkirk privateer
5/1641 Joris Pietersz van den Broeck  10        captured Dunkirk fishermen
8/1642 Joris Pietersz van den Broeck  10        sank a Dunkirk privateer


Literature:

Rotterdam in many illustrious ships, 2000 pages 11-15 by A. van der Peet

Friday, September 09, 2005

Dutch Captain: Pieter van Grootveld

Pieter van Grootveld served the Admiralty of Amsterdam as a fireship commander. In May 1672, he commanded the fireship Draak in Van Ghent's squadron. On 23 June, he was in Isaac Sweers' squadron, where he commanded the fireship Draak again. On September 20th, he was in the Texel. He commanded the fireship Salamander. In May 1673, he was with the fleet. He was attached to Lt.-Admiral Van Nes's squadron. He commanded the fireship Leidster. By about May 16, he was in Cornelis Tromp's squadron. On19 June, he was with De Haan's division.He still commanded the fireship Leidster at the Battle of the Texel in August 1673. He was attached to Isaac Sweers' division. Sources:
  1. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.
  2. J. R. Bruijn, De Oorlogvoering ter zee in 1673 in Journalen en Andere Stukken, 1966.

Thursday, September 08, 2005

Dutch Captain: Jacob de Boer

Jacob de Boer served the Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier. I have very little information about him, except we know that he fought in the Battle of Solebay, where he commanded the Jupiter (40 40 guns). In the battle, the Jupiter had 3 men killed and two severely wounded. The Jupiter was assigned to Van Ghent's squadron in the battle. The Jupiter was boarded and taken by the Royal Katherine, but was thought to be sinking, so was abandoned and recovered by the Dutch. Sources:
  1. R. C. Anderson, Journals and Narratives of the Third Dutch War, 1946.

Dr. Elias mentioned the manuscript from July 1653

On page 123 of Schetsen uit de Geschiedenis van Ons Zeewezen, Vol.V, Dr. Elias mentioned the list of ships at Vlissingen on July 2, 1653. Mostly, it is in a note. He wrote: "In deze lijst worden de schpen niet bij name genoemd". He also wrote "De namen vindt men in de correspondeerende "Lijst van de schepen, die wy (nl. de gedeputeerden te Vlissingen) in zee vinden ende daerby brengen hoe die gemonteert ende gemand zijn". There is more, but it sounds like if we found the list with names and guns from June 20, 1653 (if I am reading it correctly), we would have a goldmine of information.

Wednesday, September 07, 2005

Dutch Captain: Passchier de Witte

Passchier de Witte served the Admiralty of Zeeland. He commanded the frigate Schakerloo in 1672. He served with the fleet, but seems to have not been present at Solebay, as Anderson omits him from his list, although Brandt includes him in a May 1672 list, as well as lists for July and September 1672. Andrew has a good story about him:
From 1672 to 1674 he commanded the frigate Schakerloo (28 guns). In September 1672 he commanded the small scouting squadron near the Veerse Gat. From December 1672 to end the of 1673 he commanded Schakerloo at the squadron of Cornelis Evertsen de Jongste. He was at the capture of New York (August 1673). He fought on 23 February 1674, in the Harbour of Cadiz, against the English ship HMS Tiger. The two ships - the Dutch 'Schakerloo', 28 guns, and the British 'Tiger', 46 guns, under the command of Thomas Harman - anchored in the bay within hours of each other on 22 February. It is probable that the Dutch captain, Passchier de Witte, had come into the neutral port to avoid meeting the heavily armed British ship coming from Tangier. Coincidentally, the Dutch flagship of Admiral Cornelis Evertsen was also in port being careened (having her hull cleaned of marine growth) and the he advised de Witte to challenge Harman to fight. At about 9.00 a.m. on 23 February the 'Schakerloo', sailed out of neutral water followed by the 'Tiger'. In the fierce action, the 'Tiger's', superior firepower meant that the Dutch ship eventually surrendered and de Witte was wounded. The English losses were very light, although Harman was slightly wounded and did not enjoy his triumph for long. When four Dutch men-of-war arrived in Cadiz soon after his return there, they forced him to release his prisoners or be sunk, even though he was in a neutral port.

Tuesday, September 06, 2005

Dutch Captain: Gerolf Ysselmuyden

Gerolf Ysselmuyden served the Admiralty of the Maze. He fought in the Battle of Solebay, where he commanded the Delft (62 guns). The Delft was assigned to Lt-Admiral De Ruyter's squadron. The Delft had 20 men killed, 13 severely wounded, and 4 lightly wounded. Gerold Ysselmuyden was among the wounded. De Jonge writes that Gerolf Ysselmuyden had been captain of marines, and fought in the Battle of the Smyrna Convoy on the old ship Klein Hollandia (44 guns), which was sunk. Sources:
  1. R. C. Anderson, Journals and Narratives of the Third Dutch War, 1946.
  2. J. C. De Jonge, Geschiedenis van het Nederlandsche Zeewezen, Vol.II, 1859.

Monday, September 05, 2005

Dutch Captain: Hanske (or Anske) Fokkes

Hanske (or Anske) Fokkes served the Admiralty of Amsterdam. He died on 8 June 1673 during a landing operation on St. Eustatius carried out as part of Cornelis Evertsen de Jongste and Jacob Bincke's expedition to the West Indies. In July 1667, he commanded the frigate Overijssel (32 guns) in the Raid on Harwich. He fought in the Battle of Solebay in May 1672, where he commanded the Amsterdam (60 guns). He was assigned to Van Ghent's squadron. The Amsterdam had two men killed and four severely wounded at Solebay. Sources:
  1. R. C. Anderson, Journals and Narratives of the Third Dutch War, 1946.
  2. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.
  3. J. R. Bruijn, De Oorlogvoering ter zee in 1673 in Journalen en Andere Stukken, 1966.

Sunday, September 04, 2005

Dutch Captain: Hendrik Haeckroy

Hendrik Haeckroy served the Admiralty of Amsterdam. He fought in the Battle of Lowestoft in June 1665, where he commanded the frigate Vollenhoven (30 guns). He was assigned to Cornelis Tromp's squadron. In August, he was with De Ruyter's fleet, where he was assigned to De Ruyter's squadron. He still commanded the frigate Vollenhoven (now 28 guns, with a crew of 102 men). He is mentioned on August 29, 1665, along with captains Jan Bronser, Jan Matthijszoon, and Adriaan Teding van Berkhout, in relation to convoying VOC ships and Muscovy traders. Sources:
  1. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.
  2. Frank Fox, A Distant Storm: the Four Days' Battle of 1666, 1996.

Saturday, September 03, 2005

Dutch Captain: Evert Nachtglas

Evert Nachtglas apparently served the Admiralty of the Noorderkwartier. The first reference to him is in Brandt, page 211, when he is mentioned to be sailing for home, in company with captain 't Hoen. This is about June 1660, when they are leaving the Baltic. In 1661, he was in Vice-Admiral Meppel's division in De Ruyter's squadron sent to fight pirates in the Mediterranean Sea. Meppel's division included his ship Westfriesland, Aert van Nes's ship Prinses Louise, Cornelis Jacobszoon de Boer's ship Hollandsche Tuin, and Evert Nachtglas's ship Wapen van Alkmaar. They seem to arrived at Cadiz on 28 September 1661. Evert Nachtglas is mentioned, again, on page 246 of Brandt, where he is in company with Vice-Admiral Meppel and captain De Boer. This was apparently in August 1662, when they were to sail to Livorno (Leghorn). In October 1662, he was to sail to Malaga, to take on water and supplies. After that, he was to find the fleet and rejoin. Interestingly enough, Brandt mentions skippers Jan Reilofszoon and Lambert Bartelszoon. Evert Nachtglas left for Holland on 5 February 1663, leaving De Ruyter with 7 ships. I have some trouble reading Brandt, because of the archaic words and spelling, so I hope that I am at least close to the text presented by Brandt. Sources:
  1. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.

Friday, September 02, 2005

Dutch Captain: Jacob Troncquoij (or Troucquois)

Jacob Troncquoij served the Admiralty of Amsterdam. He commanded the Omlandia in the First Anglo-Dutch War (or at least in 1652). In the fall of 1652, he was one of the convoyers for a fleet of merchant ships heading to the Baltic. In early 1653, possibly following the Battle of Portland, the Omlandia was lying in the Texel roads. Based on the July 1653 list of ships "at Vlissingen", the Omlandia probably fought in the Battle of the Gabbard as well as the Battle of Scheveningen (or Ter Heide). In 1658, he commanded the Zeelandia (32 guns) in De Ruyter's fleet that was initially sent to the Portuguese coast. Sources:
  1. C. T. Atkinson, Ed., The First Dutch War, Vol.IV, 1910.
  2. James C. Bender, unpublished manuscript "Dutch Ships 1600-1700", 2005.
  3. Dr. S.R. Gardiner, Ed., The First Dutch War, Vol.I, 1898.

Thursday, September 01, 2005

Dutch Captain: Leyn Pikke

Leyn Pikke served the Admiralty of Zeeland. In 1659 and 1660, he was in De Ruyter's fleet that had been sent to the Baltic. He commanded the ship Veere (or Kampveere) (42 guns). In the river at Kiel, Isaac Sweers joined 8 warships and a fluit. De Ruyter's ships lay there. These were the ships of Jan Gideonszoon Verburgh, as commandeur, with captains Leyn Pikke, Auke Stellingwerf, Jacob van Berchem, Jacob Swart, Jan Richewijn, Jan de Haan, and Joost Verschuur. Perhaps this was in October 1659, as there are dates following that beginning in November 1659. I was interested to see the references to Aitzema in Brandt's biography of De Ruyter. On the 1st of December, De Ruyter with the States' fleet lay in the roads at Travemunde, not far from Lubek. In March 1660, he set sail for home in a group of 11 warships under the command of Egbert Meeuwssen Kortenaer. Sources:
  1. Gerard Brandt, Het Leven en Bedrijif van den Heere Michiel de Ruiter, 1687.

Philip van der Goes' ships

Thanks to Mr. Carl Stapel, we have the complete list of ship commanded by Philip van der Goes:
Ships which Philips van der Goes commanded

Date Adm Ship              Built Guns Crew Notes
1688 A   Sneek             1687  36   160  Willem III to England
1689 A   Schattershoef     1672  46   210  in the Channel
1690 A   Friesland         1685  68   350  Battle of Beachy Head
1692 M   Admiraal Generaal 1683  84        Battle of La Hougue
1693 M       ,,                  84        Mediterranean Sea
1694 M       ,,                  84        in the Channel
1695 M       ,,                  84        spring, iin the Channel
1695 M   Ridderschap       1692  72   400  autumm, in the Mediterranean Sea
1696 M       ,,                  72        in the Channel
1697 M       ,,                  72        coast guard and blockade of Dunkirk
1701 M   Zeven Provincien  1694  90   525  in the Channel
1702 M       ,,                  90        capture of the silverfleet at Vigos
1703 N   Beschermer        1690  90   500  squadron commander in the Mediterranean
1704 N      ,,                   90        cruising in the North Sea
1705 N   Poort van Alkmaar 1693  72   400  capture of Barcelona
1706 N   Beschermer        1690  90   500  squadron commander in the Mediterranean
1707 N      ,,                   90        siege of Toulon                  

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